Last edited by Tojazahn
Friday, August 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of moral implications of Nietzsche"s aestheticism found in the catalog.

moral implications of Nietzsche"s aestheticism

Heather Lee McGee

moral implications of Nietzsche"s aestheticism

by Heather Lee McGee

  • 355 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, -- 1844-1900 -- Aesthetics,
  • Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, -- 1844-1900 -- Criticism and interpretation

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Heather Lee McGee
    The Physical Object
    Pagination50 leaves ;
    Number of Pages50
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15269526M

      In , Nietzsche’s book was reissued with a revised title, The Birth of Tragedy, Or: Hellenism and Pessimism (Die Geburt der Tragödie, Oder: Griechentum und Pessimismus), along with a lucid and revealing prefatory essay—“An Attempt at Self-Criticism”—which expresses Nietzsche’s own critical reflections on the book, looking back.   Craig Dove's book promises to elucidate Nietzsche's ethical theory by drawing on recent work in the philosophy of mind. According to Dove, Nietzsche's work on self-consciousness "lays the foundation for the affirmative ethic he develops" (6).

    Press, ), a book which, accordingly, gives only cursory attention to Nietzsche's moral philosophy. The problems with this reading of Nietzsche-which are, I think, many-are discussed in my "Nietzsche and Aestheticism,"Journal of the History of Philoso- phy 30 (): , and my "Perspectivism in Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals," in. Aestheticism – art for art’s sake. There is a strong historical precedent for separating the moral from the aesthetic value of artworks. Oscar Wilde’s famous quote from the preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray states, “There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written, or .

      Nietzsche's Moral Philosophy [Bernstein, John Andrew] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Nietzsche's Moral Philosophy. Just a few years later, the book and the aesthetic/moral dilemma it presented became issues in the trials occasioned by Wilde’s homosexual liaisons, which resulted in his imprisonment. Of Dorian Gray’s relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, “Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian.


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Moral implications of Nietzsche"s aestheticism by Heather Lee McGee Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Conflict Between Aestheticism and Morality in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray. Patrick Duggan. Download this article. Oscar Wilde prefaces his novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, with a reflection on art, the artist, and the utility of both. After careful scrutiny, he concludes: “All art is quite useless” (Wilde 4).

This clearly written book, intended for both specialists and nonspecialists, focuses on Nietzsche s later writings, where he appears unsystematic and indifferent to questions of truth. The Moral Implications of Oscar Wilde's Aestheticism Nineteenth-century French and English "aesthetes" held that art should not be educative, that art's purpose is to create a mood or a sensation and not to advocate moral propositions; art need only fulfill possibilities of.

Aesthetic and moral value are often seen to go hand in hand. They do so not only practically, such as in our everyday assessments of artworks that raise moral questions, but also theoretically, such as in Kant's theory that beauty is the symbol of morality.

Some philosophers have argued that it is in the relation between aesthetic and moral value that the key to an adequate. Friedrich Nietzsche - Friedrich Nietzsche - Nietzsche’s mature philosophy: Nietzsche’s writings fall into three well-defined periods.

The early works, The Birth of Tragedy and the four Unzeitgemässe Betrachtungen (; Untimely Meditations), are dominated by a Romantic perspective influenced by Schopenhauer and Wagner.

The middle period, from Human, All-Too-Human up to The Gay Science. In this book, one of the most distinguished scholars of German culture collects his essays on a figure who has long been one of his chief preoccupations. Erich Heller's lifelong study of modern European literature necessarily returns again and again to Friedrich Nietzsche.

Nietzsche prided himself on having broken with all traditional ways of thinking and feeling, and once even claimed that he. In the Preface to his classic work On the Genealogy of Morality, Nietzsche wrote: “What if a regressive trait lurked in “the good man,” likewise a danger, an enticement, a poison, a narcotic, so th.

In this investigation I have tried to offer a close reading of Nietzsche's Genealogy that can give readers a sense of the remarkable complexity and range of the book. Now I would like to step back and examine a number of background issues in more detail, which can enhance an understanding of the text.

Marcovitch contends that Salome extends Wilde's critique of aestheticism begun in The Picture of Dorian Gray. In Papers on Language and Literat 1 (Winter ) [sub ser, questia]. Quintus, John Allen.

"The Moral Implications of Oscar Wilde's Aestheticism.". The book's four chapters show how four of Nietzsche's most problematic ideas benefit from this Darwinian setting.

These are: his claim that life is "will to power," his insistence that his values are "higher" yet also "just his," his disturbing ethics of selfishness and politics of inequality, and his elevation of aesthetic over moral values.

This chapter suggests that aesthetic is the way any non-moral ideal of character might be expected to look from within the perspective of morality, narrowly understood. It distinguishes another use of aesthetic in connection with ideals of character, in which it labels either a kind of conception of character Nietzsche did not have, or is.

II. Wilde published two collections of tales: The Happy Prince and Other Tales in and A House of Pomegranates in The tales did not create the sensation that the novel (The Picture of Dorian Gray, ) or the subsequent plays did, although the tales were reviewed favorably by The Saturday Review, The Athenaeum, and the Pall Mall himself said little of the two books.

Friedrich Nietzsche has long been smeared as a ghastly nihilist who repudiated all conceptions of morality. Critics point to the title of his famous work, Beyond Good and Evil, which appears to call for the repudiation of morality, as well as contain his vociferous condemnations of eternal moral his proclamation that “God is dead,” and his assertion that there is “no such.

Although Camille Paglia defends aestheticism, she does not defend moral aestheticism and is aware of the difference. In aestheticism proper art is merely independent of morality. In moral aestheticism it replaces morality.

It is true, however, that, just as moral rigorism tends to moralism, aestheticism tends to moral aestheticism. Thus, Paglia. This chapter addresses the question of the relation of aesthetic to ethical value in Nietzsche’s early and later writings. The author’s central contention is that Nietzsche wanted to effect a rapprochement between aesthetics and ethics, to extend the structure of aesthetic judgment into the ethical domain, and to effect the substitution of aesthetic for moral concepts when dealing with.

In his book, Aestheticism: The Religion of Art in Post- Romantic Literature, Leon Chai takes one of Baudelaire’s poems, “Harmonie du Soir”(), and uses it to show how Baudelaire’s ideas influenced the aesthetes.

He notes that Baudelaire appeals to the senses with his description of fragrance within the air, and furthermore, equates. Dorian is perpetually faced with moral dilemmas and he’s forced to weigh the benefits and implications of living one way or another.

Much like how Freud depicts the Ego as this force that lies between the Super Ego and the ID, Dorian is constantly being pulled in two opposite paths. Master–slave morality (German: Herren- und Sklavenmoral) is a central theme of Friedrich Nietzsche's works, particularly in the first essay of his book, On the Genealogy of che argued that there were two fundamental types of morality: "master morality" and "slave morality".Master morality values pride and power, while slave morality values kindness, empathy, and sympathy.

The implications of Wilde’s aesthetic differ from Ruskin’s and Arnold’s, but the difference is not adequately reduced to distinctions regarding what is moral and what is not.

To pursue this point I propose to look at some of Wilde’s major critical utterances, beginning with the famous preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray (). Before aestheticism, literati, moral or immoral book. Books are well written or b adly written.

That is all (Wilde, Oscar., 17). Art is. not dependent on morals for existence. It has. A summary of Part X (Section8) in Friedrich Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Genealogy of Morals and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.moral values have either originated in a ruling caste, pleasantly conscious of being different from the ruled—or among the ruled class, the slaves and dependents of all sorts.

In the first case, when it is the rulers who determine the conception “good,” it is the exalted. Is an artwork a subject of moral judgement? Can "immoral" details of a piece of art diminish its aesthetic value?

To Nietzsche justification of existence was all but impossible if one approached life in the perspective of morality, “because life is [] essentially amoral” (The Birth of Tragedy, preface, 5); and with the possible.